Women who have their periods for fewer than 30 years may be at higher risk of heart troubles in midlife

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Peer-reviewed: This work was reviewed and scrutinised by relevant independent experts.

Meta-analysis: This type of study involves using statistics to combine the data from multiple previous studies to give an overall result. The reliability of a meta-analysis depends on both the quality and similarity of the individual studies being grouped together.

People: This is a study based on research using people.

Women who have fewer than 30 years between their first period and menopause may be at higher risk of heart disease and stroke in midlife, according to Australian research. The researchers pooled the data from over 300,000 women across 12 studies and found that if the time between their first period and menopause was fewer than 30 years, women were at a 71 per cent higher risk of heart disease and stroke. Women who both started their periods early, before age 11, and also had a short time between their first period and menopause were at the highest risk.

Journal/conference: JAMA Cardiology

Link to research (DOI): 10.1001/jamacardio.2020.4105

Organisation/s: The University of Queensland, The University of Melbourne, Monash University

Funder: The InterLACE project is funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant (APP1027196). Dr Mishra is supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Principal Research Fellowship (APP1121844). A full acknowledgement list is available in the eAppendix in the Supplement.

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