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NEWS BRIEFING: Global fossil fuel emissions back on the rise - Global Carbon Budget 2017

Embargoed until: Publicly released:

**BRIEFING RECORDING NOW AVAILABLE** In a worrying change, global carbon emissions from fossil fuels and industry have climbed to an all time high in 2017 after several years of stability, according to data from the latest Global Carbon Budget. This increase is a dramatic turn around from the last three years which saw stable emissions from industry and energy, despite continuing growth in the global economy. The recent stabilisation of carbon emissions levels had been seen as an indication of rapid decoupling between global economic growth and emissions, as the world moved away from coal and switched to more renewable technology. So what does this latest turn around mean?

Organisation/s: CSIRO, The Australian National University

Media Briefing/Press Conference

From: Australian Science Media Centre

In a worrying change, global carbon emissions from fossil fuels and industry have climbed to an all time high in 2017 after several years of stability, according to data from the latest Global Carbon Budget. This increase is a dramatic turn around from the last three years which saw stable emissions from industry and energy, despite continuing growth in the global economy. The recent stabilisation of carbon emissions levels had been seen as an indication of rapid decoupling between global economic growth and emissions, as the world moved away from coal and switched to more renewable technology. So what does this latest turn around mean?

With 2017 on track to be one of the warmest on record, the researchers say time is running out on our ability to limit global average temperature increases to anything close to 2°C, let alone 1.5°C.

Join the Australian author of this new report at an online briefing to hear what and who is behind this sudden jump in emissions including:

  • What role are the major emitters like China, the US, and India playing?
  • Are Australia's emissions also going up?

Speakers:

  • Dr Pep Canadell, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Executive Director of the Global Carbon Project and author of the Global Carbon Budget
  • Professor Frank Jotzo, Director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy, at the
    Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University.

Date: Monday 13 November 2017
Start Time: 10:00am AEDT
Duration: Approx 45 min
Venue: Online

JOINING ONLINE:
Journalists can follow the briefing online via audio and video streaming.  Each presenter will speak for 5-7 minutes followed by questions. Journalists will have the opportunity to ask questions online.
1. Go to the briefing web portal by clicking here 5 minutes before the start time or anytime during the briefing.
2. Enter your name and email address
3. Click "Join".
If you are having difficulties logging in, we suggest you try pasting the link into a different browser.
(System requirements: You will need a broadband connection and speakers/headphones to hear the event. Allow 1-2 mins for your computer to be configured correctly, install ActiveX, if asked)

PHONE ONLY ACCESS:
1. For phone only access please call: 02 8518 1927.
2. Enter access code 575 787 252#.
Radio stations can also record the briefing over a phone line. If you would like to make sure that you can connect, please contact us to arrange a quick test before the day.
If you have any problems joining the briefing online, phone Webex on 1800 493 239 quoting event number 575 787 252.
Audio files will be posted on our website at scimex.org as soon as possible after the event.
For further information, please contact the AusSMC on 08 7120 8666 or email info@smc.org.au.

Attachments:

  • Australian Science Media Centre
    Web page
    Link to briefing recording

News for:

Australia
ACT

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