Resources for Journalists

COVID-19 is a disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus strain, that has not been previously identified in humans. See below for a collection of resources to help you cover this issue (Please note: additional resources are available to journalists who are logged in).

The AusSMC also issues a daily COVID-19 update for registered journalists (click here to view an example). If you would like to receive this email, please go to your profile on MyScimex and select yes beside "Receive COVID-19 Updates?". The email update and this resources page are supported by the Google News Initiative.

Latest COVID-19 news, research, expert reactions and briefings

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  1. A woman's brain fluid leaked into her nose after a COVID swab test

    Publicly released: Fri 2 Oct 2020 at 0100 AEST | 0400 NZDT

    JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

    A woman from the US had a spine-tingling complication from a COVID test after fluid from her brain leaked and ran out her nose. ... The woman had a COVID test before elective surgery and shortly Read more about A woman's brain fluid leaked into her nose after a COVID swab test

    InternationalUniversity of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
  2. Around half of South Asians are at risk of more severe COVID-19, thanks to a Neanderthal gene

    Publicly released: Thu 1 Oct 2020 at 1616 AEST | 1916 NZDT

    Nature

    The haplotype is currently present in around 16 per cent of the population in Europe, and half of people in South Asia. ... This means, for example, that those of South Asian descent may be at a higher Read more about Around half of South Asians are at risk of more severe COVID-19, thanks to a Neanderthal gene

    InternationalMax Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
  3. Cardiac arrest common for critically ill COVID-19 patients

    Publicly released: Thu 1 Oct 2020 at 0901 AEST | 1201 NZDT

    The BMJ

    Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, a US study has found. ... Looking at 5,019 critically Read more about Cardiac arrest common for critically ill COVID-19 patients

    InternationalUniversity of Michigan, USA
  4. COVID-19 might hit psych patients harder

    Publicly released: Thu 1 Oct 2020 at 0100 AEST | 0400 NZDT

    JAMA Network Open

    The team found those with a prior psych diagnosis were more likely to die compared to those with none, even when they controlled for demographics, other medical issues, and hospital location. Read more about COVID-19 might hit psych patients harder

    InternationalYale University School of Medicine, USA
  5. Hydroxychloroquine no benefit when taken before COVID-19 exposure

    Publicly released: Thu 1 Oct 2020 at 0100 AEST | 0400 NZDT

    JAMA Internal Medicine

    The team issued a daily regimen of either hydroxychloroquine or a placebo randomly to 132 health care workers over eight weeks. ... They say that while their trial was terminated early and cannot provide Read more about Hydroxychloroquine no benefit when taken before COVID-19 exposure

    InternationalUniversity of Pennsylvania, USA
  6. Can pets spread COVID-19? Dogs rule, cats drool

    Publicly released: Wed 30 Sep 2020 at 0850 AEST | 1150 NZDT

    PNAS

    While both domestic dogs and cats can catch the coronavirus, new research suggests neither household pet are likely to get sick from it. ... Scientists infected cats and dogs with the virus, finding Read more about Can pets spread COVID-19? Dogs rule, cats drool

    InternationalColorado State University, US
  7. App analyses coronavirus genome on a smartphone

    Publicly released: Tue 29 Sep 2020 at 1900 AEST | 2200 NZDT

    Communications Biology

    A team led by Garvan’s Dr Ira Deveson developed the app ‘Genopo’ that can analyse the coronavirus genome on a portable Android device. ... The new mobile app has made it possible to analyse the Read more about App analyses coronavirus genome on a smartphone

    Australia; NSWGarvan Institute of Medical Research
  8. Pandemic affects family sleep

    Publicly released: Tue 29 Sep 2020 at 1630 AEST | 1930 NZDT

    2020 European Sleep Congress

    The onset of COVID-19 disrupted day-to-day routines for millions of families around the world, with the stress and changes in routines caused by home confinement temporarily impeding normal Read more about Pandemic affects family sleep

    Australia; SAFlinders University
  9. Multi-country lockdowns proposed to stop coronavirus resurgence

    Publicly released: Tue 29 Sep 2020 at 1000 AEST | 1300 NZDT

    PNAS

    An aggressive eight-week lockdown in the cities most at risk of coronavirus could reduce hospitalisations by 90 per cent, new modelling shows. ... Researchers propose 15 high-risk cities including New Read more about Multi-country lockdowns proposed to stop coronavirus resurgence

    Australia; International; NSWTsinghua University, China
  10. Please pause your Ps to stop the spread of COVID

    Publicly released: Mon 28 Sep 2020 at 1700 AEST | 2000 NZDT

    PNAS

    Speaking successive words beginning with 'plosive' consonants - where the vocal tract is blocked and airflow stops and builds up before the letter is spoken (such as P, B and K) - can ... Droplets emitted Read more about Please pause your Ps to stop the spread of COVID

    InternationalPrinceton University, USA
  11. Aussies avoiding or delaying emergency department visits for non-COVID conditions

    Publicly released: Mon 28 Sep 2020 at 0001 AEST | 0301 NZDT

    MJA

    They looked at data from the four hospitals with EDs in the Western Sydney Local Health District, and say presentations during 29 March – 31 May were almost 25 per cent lower ... The scientists Read more about Aussies avoiding or delaying emergency department visits for non-COVID conditions

    Australia; NSWThe University of Sydney|Westmead Hospital
  12. Analysis of 32 studies confirms children are much less likely to get COVID-19

    Publicly released: Sat 26 Sep 2020 at 0100 AEST | 0300 NZST

    JAMA Pediatrics

    under the age of 20 are much less likely to contract COVID-19 than adults, particularly those younger than 14. ... The under 20s were 44 per cent less likely to suffer secondary infection with SARS-CoV-2 Read more about Analysis of 32 studies confirms children are much less likely to get COVID-19

    Australia; International; NSWThe University of Sydney|UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, UK
  13. African Americans may be more likely to get COVID-19 and to require hospital care

    Publicly released: Sat 26 Sep 2020 at 0100 AEST | 0300 NZST

    JAMA Network Open

    the disease, and more likely to end up in hospital, when factors other than race were accounted for. ... However, Black people were not more likely than other ethnic groups to require intensive care, but Read more about African Americans may be more likely to get COVID-19 and to require hospital care

    InternationalMedical College of Wisconsin, USA
  14. Older people's immune systems may be primed for worse COVID-19 outcomes

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 1252 AEST | 1452 NZST

    ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease

    The immune system profile of severe COVID-19, represented by changes in cell populations and circulating inflammatory proteins, is already partly present in healthy, older individuals, according to Read more about Older people's immune systems may be primed for worse COVID-19 outcomes

    InternationalRadboud University Medical Center, Netherlands
  15. Protein, cellular differences may explain why COVID-19 hits men harder than women

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 1229 AEST | 1429 NZST

    ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease

    The higher risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes in men could be explained by differences in proteins and immune system cells in the body compared with women, according to Dutch scientists. ... the immune system Read more about Protein, cellular differences may explain why COVID-19 hits men harder than women

    InternationalRadboud University Medical Center, Netherlands
  16. COVID-19 could be a pain in the gut too

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 1040 AEST | 1240 NZST

    JAMA

    researchers. The study looked at 92 patients with severe COVID-19 and found that 74 per cent of them developed gastrointestinal complications compared with only 37 per cent of other critically Read more about COVID-19 could be a pain in the gut too

    InternationalMassachusetts General Hospital, USA
  17. Other countries should learn from NZ's COVID-19 strategy

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 0830 AEST | 1030 NZST

    The Lancet

    Singapore, South Korea) and four in Europe (Germany, Norway, Spain, the United Kingdom). ... The authors say New Zealand's pioneering concept of social bubbles was a good example of sustainable Read more about Other countries should learn from NZ's COVID-19 strategy

    New Zealand; InternationalHelen Clark Foundation
  18. EXPERT REACTION: The reason some people develop life-threatening COVID-19 may have been found

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 0400 AEST | 0600 NZST

    Science

    The two papers show that these severe symptoms can develop in people lacking type I interferon, a set of 17 proteins crucial for protecting cells and the body from viruses. ... The first study found that Read more about EXPERT REACTION: The reason some people develop life-threatening COVID-19 may have been found

    Australia; International; NSW; VICGarvan Institute of Medical Research|Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI)...
  19. Accuracy of commercial kits for detecting COVID-19 antibodies varies widely

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 0400 AEST | 0600 NZST

    PLOS Pathogens

    Unlike throat and nose swab tests used to establish if someone is infected with COVID-19, antibody tests determine whether someone has had the virus in the past - an important part ... UK and Dutch Read more about Accuracy of commercial kits for detecting COVID-19 antibodies varies widely

    InternationalKing’s College London, UK
  20. Low mask stocks undermined health workers’ trust in their employers

    Publicly released: Fri 25 Sep 2020 at 0001 AEST | 0201 NZST

    NZMJ

    Figures from April indicate one in ten coronavirus infections were health workers, and the author writes the inadequate protection would have undermined workers’ trust in their institutions. Read more about Low mask stocks undermined health workers’ trust in their employers

    New ZealandUniversity of Otago

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